accenture covers 2012–2015
 

I've worked with Piderit + Partners on communication projects for Accenture for over 15 years. The 20 designs shown below represent one kind of project—marketing brochures for print and digital distribution. We also collaborate on interaction and video assignments. 

These are covers for brochures—designed to be displayed on screens and digitally printed on demand. On these projects, I'm the art director/designer, the Photoshop artist, and sometimes I'm the photographer. A big part of my job is interpreting the brand guidelines—I'm always looking for new ways to express the content and stay on brand. Most of the images are stock; I shot the "Search" screen image and art directed the woman light painting the green arrow. I created the digital collage with the fingerprint and globe icon, and digitally modified many of the other images. The cover with the close-up of the eye was killed :•(  — the artwork is a modified Corbis stock comp imageKarishma Sheth designed the Ten Steps cover and assisted on other designs. :•)


digital light paintings for accenture information technology services
 

Making art with photography has been a life-long love, from pre-teen Polaroids, to photographic explorations of visual narrative in art school, and later, experiments with type and image in graduate school at Yale. Now, I post photos to Instagram almost every day. Every photograph is an exploration of form and color. Whenever possible, I employ my photo skills in professional practice—art directing still photography and video, and creating photo-illustrations. 

Accenture is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company, with approximately 281,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries. These digital light paintings illustrate the annual report of Accenture's information technology services. The images are digital collages—original photographs of real people, combined with luminous colored shapes. They are expressions of transformation, collaboration, and technological empowerment. Agency: Piderit + Partners


colorchords
 

In “The Art of Color,” Johannes Itten professed a belief in the relationship between the twelve musical notes and the twelve colors of his color wheel. 
Like the twelve musical notes, the twelve colors are arranged in steps. Each note is a defined by the surrounding notes; each color is defined by its adjacent colors.
Musical notes can be combined to form harmonic chords; colors can be combined to form “color chords.”

Goethe wrote that red “conveys an impression of gravity and dignity, and at the same time grace and attractiveness.” With that in mind, I assigned a red background to the C chords. The designs move up the musical scale and around the color wheel. The backgrounds and finger dots for each chord are expressed in split-complementary colors.

Below: C, F and G ColorChord posters

The ColorChord cards for tenor guitar (below) are a fun way learn chords and chord progressions, and simultaneously play with colors.
I use these cards to map out chord progressions—and I've discovered some interesting correlations between music and color.
For example, a standard rock 3-chord progression has the same structure as a split-complementary color chord: C-F-G = red, yellow-green, blue-green.
Harmony rules! 

The Mehl ColorChord cards for tenor guitar were originally commissioned by Moo and published on the blog QuartoKnows


Stavros s. niarchos foundation
 

I was introduced to the Niarchos Foundation in 1999 by Hildy Simmons, a managing director at JPMorgan. Over the next eight years I worked with Hildy on a series of printed reports, describing the Foundation and listing the grantees. Stavros Niarchos, the namesake of the Foundation, was a Greek patriot—the images we used in the reports are expressions of his love for his country. 

My favorite images are arranged below—abstract compositions of lines and shapes, ancient Greek designs, inscribed into stone panels. These digital compositions were made from photographs I shot in early 2007 in the Greek galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. For me, these ancient designs are expressions of the timeless design principles that guide my work.

Below: spreads from the 2007 Niarchos Foundation Report


Leonard Cheshire Disability
 

Leonard Cheshire Disability is a UK-based organisation with five regional offices in Africa and Asia. Their joint projects with partner organisations support children with disabilities to go to school, adults with disabilities to earn a living, and all disabled people to access the rehabilitation, health and other support they need.

Here is sampling of the projects I have completed for Leonard Cheshire Disability, designed to be used by people with vision impairment.